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(6) Serving Pieces, Chinese Export, Canton c.1830

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(6) Serving Pieces, Chinese Export, Canton c.1830
Item Details
Description

Form: Serving peices
Components: Hard Paste
Decoration: 1 gravy boat, 2 meat platters, and 3 vegetable side platters all decorated in the blue willow pattern.
Colors: Blue & white
Markings: None
Date: c. 1830
Size: Largest: 1" H x 13" W x 9.75" D
Weight: 8 pounds
Condition: Hairline crack around handle of gravy boat, some discoloration on meat platters, minor chips around edge of one vegetable side platter.
History: The first standard pattern that was developed onto Chinese export porcelain by its popularity and success is a nowadays loosely held together group called the Willow Pattern. It seems likely that the patterns as such were designed in England based on earlier Chinese prints or paintings of river scenes. The two main variations of this pattern differs mainly is their borders and are called Spode and Mosquito pattern respectively. The Spode factory in England was established in 1770. Its "willow" border is built up by irregular geometric designs clearly distinguishing it from the "mosquito" border, also called the "brocade" border, the latter having more rounded shapes, being as I see it more artistic and containing more of recognizable Chinese symbols. Other sources have it that the Willow pattern plainly was created by Thomas Turner at Caughley Pottery Works in Shropshire about 1780. As a proof of the Willow pattern actually being an English design an alleged Chinese story are often used. It was published in an old Victorian magazine "The Family Friend" in 1849 connecting the "Willow pattern" to a romantic love story where a young student falls in love with the daughter of a corrupt Mandarin. The story went: Long ago, in the days when China was ruled by emperors, a Chinese mandarin, Tso Ling, lived in the magnificent pagoda under the branches of the apple tree on the right of the bridge, over which droops the famous willow tree, and in front of which is seen the graceful lines of the fence. Tso Ling was the father of a beautiful girl, Kwang-se, who was the promised bride of an old but wealthy merchant. The girl, however, fell in love with Chang, her father's clerk. The lovers eloped across the sea to the cottage on the island. The mandarin pursued and caught the lovers and was about to have them killed when the gods transformed them into a pair of turtle doves. These are seen gazing into each other's eyes at the top of the design. A lengthy and old Staffordshire poem of the pattern concludes with the verse: "In the oft quoted plate two birds are perceived, High in the heaven above: These are the spirits of Chang and Kwang-se, A twin pair of ever in love".
Meta: Chinese Export,Canton- Masons Ironstone, Stoneware, Pottery, Wares, China, Crackleware, Earthenware, Ceramic, Crockery, Tableware Porcelain
Buyer's Premium
  • 24.5%

(6) Serving Pieces, Chinese Export, Canton c.1830

Estimate $100 - $200
Feb 15, 2014
See Sold Price
Starting Price $50
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Ships from West Palm Beach, FL, United States
LOUIS J. DIANNI, LLC

LOUIS J. DIANNI, LLC

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0513: (6) Serving Pieces, Chinese Export, Canton c.1830

Sold for $175
2 Bids
Est. $100 - $200Starting Price $50
Day 1 of 3 - 5th Annual Palm Beach 2014
Feb 15, 2014 12:00 PM EST
Buyer's Premium 24.5%

Lot 0513 Details

Description
...

Form: Serving peices
Components: Hard Paste
Decoration: 1 gravy boat, 2 meat platters, and 3 vegetable side platters all decorated in the blue willow pattern.
Colors: Blue & white
Markings: None
Date: c. 1830
Size: Largest: 1" H x 13" W x 9.75" D
Weight: 8 pounds
Condition: Hairline crack around handle of gravy boat, some discoloration on meat platters, minor chips around edge of one vegetable side platter.
History: The first standard pattern that was developed onto Chinese export porcelain by its popularity and success is a nowadays loosely held together group called the Willow Pattern. It seems likely that the patterns as such were designed in England based on earlier Chinese prints or paintings of river scenes. The two main variations of this pattern differs mainly is their borders and are called Spode and Mosquito pattern respectively. The Spode factory in England was established in 1770. Its "willow" border is built up by irregular geometric designs clearly distinguishing it from the "mosquito" border, also called the "brocade" border, the latter having more rounded shapes, being as I see it more artistic and containing more of recognizable Chinese symbols. Other sources have it that the Willow pattern plainly was created by Thomas Turner at Caughley Pottery Works in Shropshire about 1780. As a proof of the Willow pattern actually being an English design an alleged Chinese story are often used. It was published in an old Victorian magazine "The Family Friend" in 1849 connecting the "Willow pattern" to a romantic love story where a young student falls in love with the daughter of a corrupt Mandarin. The story went: Long ago, in the days when China was ruled by emperors, a Chinese mandarin, Tso Ling, lived in the magnificent pagoda under the branches of the apple tree on the right of the bridge, over which droops the famous willow tree, and in front of which is seen the graceful lines of the fence. Tso Ling was the father of a beautiful girl, Kwang-se, who was the promised bride of an old but wealthy merchant. The girl, however, fell in love with Chang, her father's clerk. The lovers eloped across the sea to the cottage on the island. The mandarin pursued and caught the lovers and was about to have them killed when the gods transformed them into a pair of turtle doves. These are seen gazing into each other's eyes at the top of the design. A lengthy and old Staffordshire poem of the pattern concludes with the verse: "In the oft quoted plate two birds are perceived, High in the heaven above: These are the spirits of Chang and Kwang-se, A twin pair of ever in love".
Meta: Chinese Export,Canton- Masons Ironstone, Stoneware, Pottery, Wares, China, Crackleware, Earthenware, Ceramic, Crockery, Tableware Porcelain

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