logo
Weekly Auctions of Exceptional Items
Log In
lots of lots

A George III Scottish provincial silver teapot or

Related Tableware & Barware

More Items in George III Tableware & Barware

View More

Recommended Home & Décor

View More
item-104389251=1
item-104389251=2
A George III Scottish provincial silver teapot or
Item Details
Description
A George III Scottish provincial silver teapot or coffee pot stand, Aberdeen circa 1765 by James Wildgoose (active 1763-75) Of shaped circular form with shaped cavetto edge and scrolling stylised shell rim. Plain field. Raised on three pad feet. Marked with makers mark twice to reverse of rim edge. Diameter – 18 cm / 7.05 inches Weight – 253 grams / 8.13 ozt James Wildgoose (b. 1734) was apprenticed to Coline Allan, who was himself apprenticed to George Cooper. George Cooper was a prominent tea ware maker, and Allan was known to produce much holloware. While the majority of Wildgoose’s surviving pieces are spoons, there are two teapots in museum collections each of inverted baluster form raised on three legs. The positioning of the marks on the outer part of the rim is most unusual, this position has been noted on an Irish coffee pot stand marked to the reverse for William Townsend (fl.1726-75) and thrice to the rim for Michael Walsh (fl. 1758-61). Given that Townsend was a prolific maker of waiters and salvers and Walsh was not it suggests that this marking on the rim may have been adopted by items what were bought in by makers for wholesale. In addition to this a large salver (42 cm) marked to the rim for Carden Terry of Cork, which further suggests this was a marking practice adopted for bought in pieces. If this is the case and given that most surviving pieces by Wildgoose are spoons it may be that this piece was bought-in from Wildgoose’s master Coline Allan (fl. 1748-1774). The attribution to Wildgoose over John Warner of Cork is based on the rim style being that of the 1760’s whereas Warner became a freeman in 1775 and died in 1810. This form of foot is also seen on stands from Aberdeen makers such as George Cooper. Although the makers mark is poorly struck there is a noticeable space in between the I and the W as well as the serifs on the W which are found on spoons with the IW mark and ABD.
Buyer's Premium
  • 25% up to £500,000.00
  • 12.5% above £500,000.00

A George III Scottish provincial silver teapot or

Estimate £600 - £800
Jun 11, 2021
See Sold Price
Starting Price £600
Get pre-approved to bid live.
Shipping, Payment & Auction Policies
See Policy for Shipping
Ships from London, London, United Kingdom
Chiswick Auctions

Chiswick Auctions

London, United Kingdom
2,465 Followers
logo
www.liveauctioneers.com
item

0544: A George III Scottish provincial silver teapot or

Lot Passed
0 Bids
Est. £600 - £800Starting Price £600
Silver & Objects of Vertu
Jun 11, 2021 6:30 AM EDT
Buyer's Premium 25%

Lot 0544 Details

Description
...
A George III Scottish provincial silver teapot or coffee pot stand, Aberdeen circa 1765 by James Wildgoose (active 1763-75) Of shaped circular form with shaped cavetto edge and scrolling stylised shell rim. Plain field. Raised on three pad feet. Marked with makers mark twice to reverse of rim edge. Diameter – 18 cm / 7.05 inches Weight – 253 grams / 8.13 ozt James Wildgoose (b. 1734) was apprenticed to Coline Allan, who was himself apprenticed to George Cooper. George Cooper was a prominent tea ware maker, and Allan was known to produce much holloware. While the majority of Wildgoose’s surviving pieces are spoons, there are two teapots in museum collections each of inverted baluster form raised on three legs. The positioning of the marks on the outer part of the rim is most unusual, this position has been noted on an Irish coffee pot stand marked to the reverse for William Townsend (fl.1726-75) and thrice to the rim for Michael Walsh (fl. 1758-61). Given that Townsend was a prolific maker of waiters and salvers and Walsh was not it suggests that this marking on the rim may have been adopted by items what were bought in by makers for wholesale. In addition to this a large salver (42 cm) marked to the rim for Carden Terry of Cork, which further suggests this was a marking practice adopted for bought in pieces. If this is the case and given that most surviving pieces by Wildgoose are spoons it may be that this piece was bought-in from Wildgoose’s master Coline Allan (fl. 1748-1774). The attribution to Wildgoose over John Warner of Cork is based on the rim style being that of the 1760’s whereas Warner became a freeman in 1775 and died in 1810. This form of foot is also seen on stands from Aberdeen makers such as George Cooper. Although the makers mark is poorly struck there is a noticeable space in between the I and the W as well as the serifs on the W which are found on spoons with the IW mark and ABD.

Contacts

Chiswick Auctions
+44 020 8992 4442
1 Colville Rd
London, W3 8BL
UK
LiveAuctioneers Support
info@liveauctioneers.com
iphoneandroidPhone

Get notifications from your favorite auctioneers.

TOP